HR Administration

Rest and lunch break laws in every US state

By Gustav Anderson

Aug. 11, 2022

Summary

  • Federal law does not require meal or rest breaks

  • Some states have laws requiring meal and rest breaks

  • Businesses should take the necessary steps to more accurately schedule and record these break times

 

When it comes to rest and lunch breaks, it’s easy for managers to assume that a few minutes here and there won’t make a difference.

However, this is simply not the case. We’ve seen break rule violations result in costly lawsuits over the past several years.

Back in April, an Oregon healthcare facility filed a lawsuit with the federal court system in an effort to overturn the state’s detailed meal and rest break rules. It’s an attempt to get out of nearly $100 million in fines due to persistent violations of employee meal and rest break rights dating all the way back to 2015.

What’s confusing is that if this healthcare facility was in a different state, say Arkansas for instance, these violations and fines would not exist.

Federal guidance on the subject of lunch breaks is slim to none. State laws concerning paid and unpaid work breaks, however, vary.

It’s important to understand what rules do and do not apply to your business.

Whitepaper: The Complete Guide to Wage & Hour Compliance

Federal break laws

There is no federal law that requires companies to offer breaks during work hours for meals or any other purpose.

However, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, federal law does say that if a company chooses to allow break periods, any break under 20 minutes should be paid, and any over 30 minutes can be unpaid and classified as off-the-clock.

So, in essence, the federal government leaves it up to the employer. Rest breaks (under 20 minutes) are paid and meal breaks (over 30 minutes) are unpaid. If a state does not have its own explicit laws regarding breaks, these federal standards automatically apply.

State break laws

It is up to the states to choose their own lunch and rest break laws. Some states default to the federal policy, while others have their very own set of specific regulations to follow.

All meal and rest break laws only apply to non-exempt employees. For exempt employees receiving a salary of over $23,000 a year, breaks are up to the discretion of the employer.

Find your state below and click on it to see its rest and lunch break rules:


Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming


Alabama

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: 14-15-year-old employees who work more than 5 continuous hours get a 30-minute break.

Alabama defaults to federal law regarding breaks for workers aged 16+. If an employer chooses to provide a break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Alaska

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: Minors ages 14-17 who work 5+ consecutive hours get a 30-minute break.

Alaska defaults to federal law regarding breaks for workers aged 18 and over. If an employer chooses to provide a break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Arizona

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: None

Arizona defaults to federal law regarding breaks for all workers. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Arkansas

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: None

Arkansas defaults to federal law regarding breaks for workers of all ages. If an employer chooses to provide a break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than this do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

The state does have a special lactation break law. Employers must provide reasonable unpaid break time to employees who are lactating. These breaks must be taken in a private place close to their work area (not a bathroom stall).

 

 

California

Meal Break:

Employees get a 30-minute paid meal break during a shift that is longer than five consecutive hours. If the employee is relieved of regular work duties and can leave the premises during their break, the break goes unpaid. But if these requirements are not met, the break must be paid at the regular rate of pay.

An employee may also waive their lunch break upon mutual consent with management if a workday will be completed in six hours or fewer.

If a work shift is longer than 10 hours, a second 30-minute rest break must be provided. If a total of 12 hours or fewer are worked in a day, this second meal break may be waived, but only if the first meal period was not waived.

If an employer fails to provide an employee a meal break during a shift, they owe the employee one extra hour of pay at the employee’s regular rate.

Rest Break:

Employees get a 10-minute paid rest break every 4 hours. A 10-minute break is not required for work time totaling less than three and a half hours.

Employees working in extreme weather conditions must also be provided with a five-minute “recovery period” in a protected environment in addition to their meal and rest break.

For every day an employee is forced to work through one or more of their rest breaks, their employer must pay them one additional hour of wages at the regular rate.

Minor Break: N/A

 

 

Colorado

Meal Break: 30 minutes for employees who work 5+ hours. If the break is “duty-free” it goes unpaid. However, if a “duty-free” meal is not possible, the employee may take an “on-duty” meal, in which case the employee must be paid.

Rest Break: 10 minutes paid per 4 hours worked only for employees in the retail, food and beverage, commercial support, health, and medical industries.

Minor Break: N/A

 

 

Connecticut

Meal Break: 30 minutes for non-exempt employees who work at least 7.5 hours. Employers are exempt from this requirement only if:

  1. Complying endangers public safety
  2. The duties of the position can only be done by one employee
  3. Fewer than five employees are working a shift in a particular location
  4. Operations require employees to be available to respond to urgent conditions

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: N/A

 

 

Delaware

Meal Break: Unpaid 30 minutes for employees 18+ who work at least 7.5 hours. Meal breaks must be given sometime after the first two hours of work and before the last two hours of work. Employers are exempt from this requirement only if:

  1. Complying endangers public safety
  2. The duties of the position can only be done by one employee
  3. Fewer than five employees are working a shift in a particular location
  4. Operations require employees to be available to respond to urgent conditions
  5. There exists a collective bargaining agreement that provides otherwise
  6. The employee is employed by a local school board to work directly with children

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: 30 minutes for employees under 18 for every 5 consecutive hours of work.

 

 

Florida

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: 30 minutes for employees under 18 who work at least 4 hours.

Florida defaults to federal law regarding breaks for workers aged 18 and over. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Georgia

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: None

Georgia defaults to federal law regarding breaks for all workers. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Hawaii

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: 30 minutes for 14 and 15-year-old employees who work 5 consecutive hours

Hawaii defaults to federal law regarding breaks for workers aged 16 and over. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Idaho

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: None

Hawaii defaults to federal law regarding breaks for all workers. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Illinois

Meal Break: At least 20 minutes unpaid for employees who work 7.5+ continuous hours. Must be given no later than five hours after beginning work.

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: At least 30 minutes for employees under 16 who work 5+ hours.

 

 

Indiana

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: 1-2 breaks totaling 30 minutes for employees under 18 who work at least 6 consecutive hours.

Indiana defaults to federal law regarding breaks for workers aged 18+. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Iowa

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: At least 30 minutes for employees under the age of 16 who work 5+ consecutive hours.

Iowa defaults to federal law regarding breaks for workers aged 16 and over. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Kansas

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: None

Kansas defaults to federal law regarding breaks for all workers. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Kentucky

Meal Break: Reasonable unpaid period (typically 20-30 min) after the third and before the fifth hour of work for employees who work 5+ consecutive hours.

Rest Break: 10 minutes after every 4 hours of work.

Minor Break: N/A

 

 

Louisiana

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: At least 30 minutes unpaid for employees under 18 who work 5 consecutive hours

Louisiana defaults to federal law regarding breaks for workers aged 18 and over. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Maine

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: At least 30 minutes unpaid for all employees who work 6+ hours, but only if there are three or more people on duty.

Minor Break: N/A

 

 

Maryland

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: Only those in the retail industry get 15 minutes for a shift of 4-6 hours, 30 minutes for a shift of 6+ hours, and 30 minutes for an 8+ hour shift with an additional 15 minutes for every additional 4 working hours.

Minor Break: 30 minutes for employees under 18 for every 5 consecutive hours of work.

 

 

Massachusetts

Meal Break: 30 minutes unpaid for employees who work 6+ hours, excluding those in factory and mechanical establishments.

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: N/A

 

 

Michigan

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: At least 30 minutes for employees under 18 if they work more than 5 consecutive hours.

Michigan defaults to federal law regarding breaks for workers aged 18 and over. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Minnesota

Meal Break: Sufficient unpaid time to eat a meal for employees who work 8+ hours. Must be paid if less than 20 minutes.

Rest Break: Sufficient time to use the restroom every 4 hours.

Minor Break: N/A

 

 

Mississippi

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: None

Mississippi defaults to federal law regarding breaks for all workers. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Missouri

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: None

Missouri defaults to federal law regarding breaks for all workers. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Montana

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: None

Montana defaults to federal law regarding breaks for all workers. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Nebraska

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: At least 30 minutes per 8-hour shift for employees of an assembling plant, workshop, or mechanical establishment.

Minor Break: None

 

 

Nevada

Meal Break: At least 30 minutes for employees working 8+ continuous hours.

Rest Break: At least 10 minutes paid every 4 hours. If an employee’s total work time is less than 3 and a half hours, then this break is not typically not required.

Minor Break: N/A

 

 

New Hampshire

Meal Break: 30 minutes for employees who work 5+ consecutive hours.

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: N/A

 

 

New Jersey

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: At least 30 minutes for employees under 18 who work 5+ hours.

New Jersey defaults to federal law regarding breaks for workers aged 18 and over. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

New Mexico

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: None

New Mexico defaults to federal law regarding breaks for all workers. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

New York

Meal Break:

30 minutes for employees who work 6+ hours, or 45 minutes for employees midway through a 6+ hour shift that starts between 1 p.m. and 6 a.m. An additional 20 minutes between 5 p.m and 7 p.m. for those working a shift starting before 11 a.m. and continuing after 7 p.m.

Different rules apply to factory workers. They get a 1-hour period anywhere between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. for 6+ hour shifts, or a 60-minute break midway through a shift of more than 6 hours that starts between 1 p.m. and 6 a.m.

Rest Break: 24 consecutive hours per week

Minor Break: N/A

 

 

North Carolina

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: At least 30 minutes for employees under 16 who work 5+ hour shifts.

North Carolina defaults to federal law regarding breaks for workers aged 16+. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

North Dakota

Meal Break: 30 minutes unpaid for employees who work 5+ hours when 2 or more employees are on duty.

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: N/A

 

 

Ohio

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: At least 30 minutes unpaid for employees under 18 working 5 consecutive hours.

Ohio defaults to federal law regarding breaks for workers aged 18+. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Oklahoma

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: At least 30 minutes for every 5 hours worked and 1 hour for every 8 hours worked for employees under 16.

Oklahoma defaults to federal law regarding breaks for workers aged 16 and over. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Oregon

Meal Break: At least 30 minutes, unpaid, uninterrupted, and relieved of all duties, must be provided per 6 hours worked. No meal break is required for shifts under 6 hours.

  • 6-14 hours: 1 break
  • 14-22 hours: 2 breaks
  • 22-24 hours: 3 breaks

Rest Break: 10 minutes paid based on hours worked.

  • 2-6 hours: 1 break
  • 6-10 hours: 2 breaks
  • 10-14 hours: 3 breaks
  • 14-18 hours: 4 breaks
  • 18-22 hours: 5 breaks
  • 22-24 hours: 6 breaks

Minor Break: Workers under 18 receive the same meal breaks as adults, however, it is required that they get 15-minute rest breaks rather than 10-minute.

 

 

Pennsylvania

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: 30 minutes per 5 hours for workers under 18 years of age.

Pennsylvania defaults to federal law regarding breaks for workers aged 18 and over. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Rhode Island

Meal Break: 20 minutes for employees who work 6 hours and 30 minutes for employees who work 8+ hours. The break may be unpaid if the employee is relieved of all duties.

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: N/A

 

 

South Carolina

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: None

South Carolina defaults to federal law regarding breaks for all workers. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

South Dakota

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: None

South Dakota defaults to federal law regarding breaks for all workers. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Tennessee

Meal Break: At least 30 minutes for employees who work 6+ hours

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: N/A

 

 

Texas

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: None

Texas defaults to federal law regarding breaks for all workers. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Utah

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: At least 30 minutes for a lunch period no later than 5 hours into the workday for employees under 18. They must also be given a 10-minute rest break for every 4 hours worked and cannot work 3+ consecutive hours without a 10-minute break.

Utah defaults to federal law regarding breaks for workers aged 18 and over. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Vermont

Meal Break: Must provide a “reasonable opportunity” for employees to eat and use the restroom. This opportunity must be paid if it is less than 20 minutes.

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: N/A

Vermont has a special lactation break law requiring employers to provide reasonable break time throughout the day to employees who are lactating. It is left to the employer’s discretion whether these breaks are paid or unpaid unless denoted by a collective bargaining agreement.

 

 

Virginia

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: At least 30 minutes for employees under 16 who work 5+ consecutive hours.

Virginia defaults to federal law regarding breaks for workers aged 16 and over. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Washington

Meal Break: 30 minutes for every 5 consecutive hours worked, given not less than 2 hours nor more than 5 hours from the beginning of a shift. 30 additional minutes for employees who work at least 3 hours past the time they normally end their shift. Unpaid if the employee is completely free of duties.

Rest Break: At least 10 minutes for every 4 hours worked.

Minor Break: 14 and 15-year-old employees must have a 30-minute meal break before working 4 consecutive hours. A 30-minute meal break is required for employees ages 16 and 17 no less than 2 hours but no more than 5 hours from the beginning of their shift.

 

 

West Virginia

Meal Break: 20 minutes for employees who work 6+ hours.

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: At least 30 minutes if scheduled to work over 5 hours.

 

 

Wisconsin

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: 30 minutes duty-free for employees under 18 when working 6+ consecutive hours. 16 and 17-year-olds must have 8 hours of rest between shifts if scheduled after 8 p.m.

Wisconsin defaults to federal law regarding breaks for workers aged 18+. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 

 

Wyoming

Meal Break: None

Rest Break: None

Minor Break: None

Wyoming defaults to federal law regarding breaks for all workers. If an employer chooses to provide a meal break, it must be paid only if it lasts less than 20 minutes. Breaks lasting longer than 30 minutes are classified as meal periods and do not need to be paid, as long as the employee is completely relieved of all duties.

 


Meal vs. rest breaks

The main difference between a meal and a rest break is often its length. The typical meal break is 20-30 minutes and must be taken around midday, while a rest break is usually anywhere between 10-15 minutes and occurs at regular intervals throughout a shift.

As with lunch breaks, no federal labor law requires short breaks at work. Only 11 states have local laws requiring employers to offer rest periods during work hours, and these short breaks almost always come in addition to a meal break. For instance, Colorado requires a 30-minute meal break for 5+ hour shifts, as well as a 10-minute break for every four hours of work.

Sometimes, however, it’s all just semantics.

Take Maine for example. The Pine Tree State is the only one of these 11 states that does not have a “meal break” per see, but it does have a rest break, requiring 30-minutes for work periods of over six hours. Technically, it’s not a meal break, just a rest break, but you and I both know it’s its used for lunch.

Minors and break laws

State laws typically afford minors more break leniency than adult employees. While most state meal break rules for adults automatically cover minors, some states have specific standards for those under 18. Delaware, for example, gives adults a 30-minute break for seven and a half hours worked while giving those under 18 the same break time for only five hours worked.

Some of the states with no adult lunch or rest break rules have unique break laws in place for minors. For instance, Louisiana and Michigan require employers to give 30-minute breaks to employees under 18 for shifts longer than five consecutive hours. In Hawaii, however, this same rule only applies to 14 and 15-year-olds.

Managing rest and meal breaks

If your state has specific rest break requirements, it’s essential that management understands them and takes appropriate action to uphold them. This, of course, is sometimes easier said than done.

Without the right protocols and tools in place, tracking breaks can be very difficult, especially in complicated states like California, Oregon, and New York. Luckily, there are many ways to automate the workload.

An online employee scheduling and time tracking platform like Workforce.com handles all break and employment law compliance for you, meaning staff will never miss breaks and your business will never be hit with penalties. Here are a few specific ways the cloud-based system helps you plan lunch breaks and calculate compensation accurately:

Auto-schedule compliant breaks

Workforce.com’s scheduling allows managers to automatically apply compliant meal and rest breaks to employee schedules according to local state laws. Employees can easily view these breaks right from their phones, knowing exactly when to work and when to rest.

Capture break clock-out data

Via a time clock app, staff can temporarily clock out for breaks, then clock back in once their break is over. This granular time clock data helps managers easily pinpoint non-compliant break times on timesheets.

Utilize time clock questions

Managers can create conditional questions that appear whenever an employee clocks out of a shift. These questions may ask things like “Did you waive your break?” or “Did you take your break?” depending on the length of the shift. Answers will automatically add all necessary premiums and allowances to timesheets, ensuring employees are always paid accurately.

Track breaks in real-time

With a live time clock feed, managers can see who’s working, who’s not, and who’s on break – all in one place and in real-time. This frontline visibility helps managers respond more quickly to lunch break non-compliance.

Manage break rules across state lines

Workforce.com comes with robust team and location functionality, letting you set up multiple locations on the platform. Break rules at each location can be configured according to local state laws, ensuring chains stay organized no matter where they are located in the country.

Take control of break times and protect your business

There are two key things managers can do right now to ensure their business stays on the right side of the law. One is to understand and adhere to whatever legislation applies in your state. The other is to be clear as to what breaks are allowed, encourage staff to use these breaks fully, and ensure they are accurately recorded.

Doing all of this manually is a huge task and is prone to human error. Use employee scheduling software instead to automate the process of how breaks are administered and use a time and attendance system to log hours and wages accurately so you’ll never have to search through old time cards and spreadsheets for the data you need.

To find out more, check out our free whitepaper below, or set up a call with one of our workforce management consultants today.

Whitepaper: The Practical Guide to Time and Attendance Management

Gustav is a communications officer with Workforce.com. His past work includes media outreach for a Guinness World Record team and market research published by the University of Maine. He has a keen interest in storytelling, frontline labor issues, and all things relating to pigeons.

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