Legal

Randstad to Pay $60,000 in EEOC Suit

By Staffing Analysts

May. 10, 2012

Randstad US agreed to pay $60,000 to settle a disability bias lawsuit, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission reported today. The company allegedly refused to hire Jason O’Dell at its Frederick, Maryland, branch because of his disability; O’Dell suffered from Asperger’s syndrome, according to the EEOC.

O’Dell had applied for a job at Randstad’s Frederick branch and was fast-tracked for a lab technician position, according to the EEOC. However, he was told that the lab technician position had been put “on hold” and not hired after informing the company of his disability, the agency said. However, recruitment for the position continued.

In addition to the $60,000, the settlement also requires Randstad to modify its anti-discrimination policy, provide two hours of on-site training to workers at the company’s Frederick branch, amend its nationwide employment law compliance training, post a notice in all Maryland branches regarding discrimination and permit O’Dell to take 10 classes through the Randstad University Online Training Center.

Filed by Staffing Industry Analysts, a sister company of Workforce Management. To comment, email editors@workforce.com.

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